Do you have an elderly parent that still drives? Check out these AAA resources for older drivers

Transportation is one of the most requested Village services nationwide—in particular, transportation to night events, during bad weather, and when heavy traffic or freeway driving is the only option.   What this suggests—and is confirmed by this report from AAA—is that many older adults who still drive voluntarily avoid high-risk driving situations:

“Helping to dispel the all-too-common myth that seniors are dangerous drivers, AAA’s survey  indicates that motorists age 65 and older often “self-police” their driving or avoid driving situations that put them at greater risk of a crash. In fact, 80 percent of senior drivers voluntarily avoid one or more high-risk driving situations. More than half (61 percent) of these drivers avoid driving in bad weather; 50 percent avoid night driving; 42 percent avert trips in heavy traffic and 37 percent avoid unfamiliar roads.”

Obviously, this is a good thing.  But how do you know when that’s not enough and it’s time to give up the car altogether?  Apparently AAA has some online resources and educational programs that can help with making that decision:

AAA offers helpful resources for older adults and their families—working to support them as they tackle the challenge of balancing safety and mobility. SeniorDriving.AAA.com provides convenient, online access to a wealth of interactive material and AAA’s Senior Driver Safety Expos offer a local hands-on opportunity to sample AAA’s suite of free tools and programs including:

· AAA Roadwise Review – A computer-based screening tool that allows older drivers to measure changes in their functional abilities scientifically linked to crash risk.

· CarFit – A community-based program that offers older adults the opportunity to check how well their personal vehicles “fit” them for maximum comfort and safety.

· Smart Features for Mature Drivers – A guide to help identify vehicle features that can assist drivers with the visual, physical and mental changes that are frequently encountered as they age.”

via Do you have an elderly parent that still drives? AAA just released a new report and advice that I think is worth a read…. | LinkedIn.

When the time to give up driving finally comes, I think being a member of a Village can make all the difference in how much of a hardship this turns out to be.

Why? Because, unless you’re on a major transportation line or a live in a highly walkable neighborhood with all the amenities close by, fear of losing mobility can make you hold onto the car keys longer than you should.   But if you’re a member of a Village, the Village office will not only know all the free/low-cost transportation options available and be able to help you access them, they will also have village transportation volunteers to help fill the gaps and ensure you can get where you need to go. So less stress, less hardship, less loss.

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Golden Girls Go Home: A Twin Cities organization touts the affordability — and fun — of shared housing arrangements

  While searching for more information about Golden Girls homes as a housing option, I came across this article about a Minneapolis organization that helps older single/divorced/widowed women find or create affordable shared housing.  Seems like something that would benefit “women of a certain age” from coast-to-coast, and not dissimilar to what Michele Fiasca is trying to do locally with her website “Let’s Share Housing Together.”

Anyway, here is the article for you to enjoy and hopefully be inspired by:

“The ’80s TV sitcom The Golden Girls  gave Connie Skillingstad a good idea: older women who live together. Skillingstad is founder of Golden Girl Homes, a group that helps older widows, divorcees, and otherwise single women find or create alternative, affordable shared housing.

‘Golden Girls is about helping open up the options for women,’ says Skillingstad.  Formed in 2001, the Twin Cities-based nonprofit is based on the  premise that older women want, need, and deserve more diverse housing options than senior housing facilities or solitary living. For many women it is not financially feasible to purchase and maintain a house on their own, and single living may leave them feeling lonely and disconnected.

‘A lot of women are interested in living in communities,’ says Skillingstad, a 59-year-old social worker. ‘The senior housing that’s being built by developers is too expensive, and many women don’t want to live in a senior housing complex.’

The Golden Girls solution is not so much matching up potential roommates as it is helping with the logistics of shared housing. To this end, the group, which includes about 200 women whose ages range from 40 into the 80s, meets monthly to discuss everything from the legal issues of these new-style households to the practicalities of living with people other than family. They are currently working to create a list of questions that potential roommates can ask each other to gauge their compatibility.”

via Golden Girls Go Home.

Golden Girls 2.0: Shared housing as a retirement strategy

I have a sister who is two years younger than me, who got divorced in her 30’s and has never remarried.  Although she still has an occasional beau, her girl friends are the mainstay of her life—there through thick and thin.  She currently lives alone in a 3 bedroom home, but she has always said that when she retires, she wants to live in a “Golden Girls home” like the characters on the TV show of that same name.  I think it’s a great idea and apparently I’m not alone, as this article from Reuters Money explains:

“Those Golden Girls may have been on to something. Alternative living arrangements — like the group house featured in the popular 80′s sitcom — are gaining steam among retired women, affording them a higher standard of living, in-home support services and companionship while aging in place.

Want to employ that personal chef you’ve always dreamed about? What about a pool and a view of the 18th hole? With women living at least five years longer than men on average, home sharing — which is dominated by women — helps them maintain or even elevate the quality of life in retirement.

Homesharing allows participants to continue a certain kind of lifestyle that they may not be able to afford when they are out of the workforce, single or widowed. That’s really the most compelling reason to share a home, but companionship is a big draw, says Nancy Thompson, AARP spokesperson. “It’s nice to have company, to remark about something to someone, or to share your interests,” she says.

“I’ve often said I wanted to live like the Golden Girls,” says Marianne Kilkenny, home share advocate and founder of Women for Living in Community. Kilkenny, 61, shares an Ashville, North Carolina home with four other renters — two women and a married couple — ranging in age from 58 to 71. “For boomer women, we’re the first generation that has had the financial means to be able to live on our own for any length of time and are finding that it gets really old because you have to count only on yourself,” she says.

A sense of belonging and peace of mind is integral, says Kilkenny, adding shared housing has allowed her to live in a nicer home with better appliances in a swankier neighborhood. “One of the oldest human needs is having someone to wonder where you are when you don’t come home at night,” she says, quoting Margaret Mead. “For those of us who have been single, these are the things you don’t know you are missing.”

In 2010, there were approximately 480,000 baby boomer women living with at least one female non-relative roommate and no spouses, according to an AARP analysis of population survey data. That’s approximately 130,000 Golden-Girl type households across the country.

via Golden Girls 2.0: Shared housing as a retirement strategy | Reuters Money.

Here in Portland, if you’re a mature adult and you  want to find equally mature—and compatible—housemates,  the person to contact is Michele at Let’s Share Housing Together (www.letssharehousing.com/) who will help you make the perfect match.  And who knows? If they decide to re-make the Golden Girls, they may just come and cast you!